Recent Protest of Army Acquisition Has Big Implications for Future Corrective Actions

Army LPTA

Often regarded as one of the simplest acquisition methods, Lowest Price Technically Acceptable (LPTA) procurements award the contract to the offeror that both meets an agency’s technical requirements and offers the lowest price. Yet when the Army set out to acquire a replacement for an existing Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract through an LPTA procurement, things got complicated. In fact, a whopping 21 companies ended up protesting at GAO. When the army tried to correct the problematic procurement with corrective action, the original awardees took the case to the COFC. But it didn’t end there, and the case eventually made its way to the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC). The zigzagging case sets a precedent for whether an agency must narrowly tailor corrective action to fit a procurement’s perceived flaw or if the corrective action need only be rationally related to that flaw.  Continue reading “Recent Protest of Army Acquisition Has Big Implications for Future Corrective Actions”

A Federal Appellate Court Ruling Has Big Implications for Contractors with Commercial Technologies Hoping to Compete for Government Contracts

The Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act (FASA) requires that Federal agencies seriously consider whether existing commercial items will meet their acquisition requirements before seeking to develop new technologies. In a recent case, Palantir Technologies protested when the Army failed to consider commercial technologies for its second-generation Distributed Common Grounds System (DCGS-A) intelligence system. Read on to learn why the COFC’s ruling may set a precedent for more protests from commercial vendors.

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Pay Attention to these 7 Changes from the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA)

Last month, the President signed Congress’ FY 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, calling for a host of adjustments to the rules of Federal procurement. Each year the NDAA updates programs and policy initiatives, often in response to complaints from either the Executive Branch or industry. Most updates will make their way into the FAR or the DoD FAR supplement. What follows is an overview of the most important changes you’ll want to know about.

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Can Agencies Rely on CBP Rulings in Enforcing the Trade Agreements Act?

A new ruling says that Federal agencies can’t always rely on country-of-origin rulings by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) when applying the Trade Agreements Act to their contracts. The case dealt with an acquisition of Hepatitis B pill by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The difficulty in parsing the regulations suggests that they need revision, if not a complete rewrite.   Continue reading “Can Agencies Rely on CBP Rulings in Enforcing the Trade Agreements Act?”

The Legal Precedent for Contract by Conduct in the Public/Private Realm Doesn’t Support a Contract Here

Moda Health Plan, Inc. is one of dozens of insurers who sued when the Health and Human Services Department (HHS) failed to reimburse them for losses incurred as a result of participation in the healthcare marketplace set up by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The Court of Federal Claims (COFC), and later the Federal Circuit, were tasked with determining whether there had been a contract by conduct set up between the Government and insurers. Despite success at the COFC, the Federal Circuit eventually denied Moda’s case. The case serves as a cautionary tale for companies considering entering into similar Government programs.  Continue reading “The Legal Precedent for Contract by Conduct in the Public/Private Realm Doesn’t Support a Contract Here”

What Happens When the Government Perceives a Cybersecurity Risk in Your Supply Chain

The Federal Government is amping up its efforts to mitigate threats to cybersecurity. You might think that the Department of Homeland Security would be the agency concerned with mitigating risk stemming from cyber threats. But a recent case at the Court of Federal Claims (COFC) shows that Government’s preoccupation with cybersecurity extends to all agencies. In this case, the Social Security Administration (SSA) needed new printers, but was determined to avoid supply chain risks that they felt one bidder’s offer posed. The COFC sided with the agency in this case, which raises the question whether the Federal Government should centralize such decisions.   Continue reading “What Happens When the Government Perceives a Cybersecurity Risk in Your Supply Chain”

What RAND’s New Study Reveals, and Implications for Contractors

When DoD sought restrictions on bid protests, Congress had them commission a study to prove their case. DoD then hired the RAND Corporation to study bid protests during the 9-year period from 2008-2016. The study indicates a significant increase in the number of bid protests over that time period. That trend alone bolsters the DoD’s case. But a further look at the extensive data from RAND’s study suggests otherwise, and provides critical insights for Defense contractors.

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When Offering a Low Cost Is Detrimental, and a Different Way to Show Technical Acceptability

It sounds simple. In Lowest Price Technically Acceptable (LPTA) procurements, the agency determines the best value proposal by identifying those that are technically acceptable and then selecting the one with the lowest price. But there’s a wrinkle when this technique is used for a cost-reimbursement contract. Smartronix’s recent protest at GAO illustrates that proposing the lowest cost doesn’t always win you the contract, even when you’re technically acceptable. Specifically, contractors if the proposed cost is too low, the Government can adjust it upwards. Read on to learn more about this problem and how to avoid it.

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When Poor Performance Reviews Become a Matter of Public Record: What Contractors Need to Know

Statute and regulation prevent public access to contractor past performance information. That said, contractors who contest poor performance reviews in Court or at a board may unintentionally put themselves at risk to have the details of the matter released in a public decision. Such was the case for Torres Advanced Enterprise Solutions, whose recent protest at the COFC inadvertently lead to their performance issues becoming a matter of public record. The case serves as a cautionary tale for other contractors considering whether to contest a poor performance review.  Continue reading “When Poor Performance Reviews Become a Matter of Public Record: What Contractors Need to Know”

Don’t Approve of Your Competitors in a Multiple Award IDIQ Contract? Know This Before You Protest.

Sometimes multiple contractors earn spots on Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracts, which allow for an undetermined quantity of supplies or services during a fixed period of time, as outlined in FAR. But what happens when winning contractors have reservations about the competitors who earn contracts alongside them? DaeKee Global Co. found itself in such a situation, and reacted by protesting the terms of the solicitation. Read on to learn how GAO and the COFC responded to such protests, and what this means for contractors concerned about their bedfellows in IDIQ contracts.   Continue reading “Don’t Approve of Your Competitors in a Multiple Award IDIQ Contract? Know This Before You Protest.”